Addressing Speech Anxiety, Planning, & Topic Selection

Abstract

This paper explains the following scenario: “Think back for a moment on a speech that you have made or what you start to think about when you think of public speaking”, and answers the following questions: “ 1. What past experiences have you had that frame your feelings about public speaking? 2. What false beliefs about public speaking do you need to replace? 3.  Why is it important to allow time for creativity in the speech development process? 4. Why is oral preparation preferable to practice “in your head”? 5. How will you overcome your personal planning pitfalls? 6. Explain the process and benefit of selecting a topic appropriate to the audience and occasion. 7.  How might one’s audience influence topic selection? 8. Brainstorm a list of possible speech topics, choose the topic you’re most interested in speaking about, and create a general purpose, specific purpose, primary audience outcome, and contributing audience outcome for this speech.

Keywords: public, audience, purpose, speech.  A

My past experiences taught me a lot about public speaking and partly framed my feelings about this process. From my past experiences I can state that public speaking is a conversation between a speaker and the audience. Here, it is crucially important to exchange messages and ideas in order to inform, evoke, invite or persuade your audience.

Next, what false beliefs about public speaking do you need to replace? As known, speaking in public (formally or informally) requires effort. Public speaking is inherently scary for many of us, but our fears only make a situation worse. It is a skill that requires a lot of practice and training. Everyone can become a successful public speaker. You just need to choose your personal relaxed conversational style that helps overcome nerves, and get rid of wrong ideas about public speaking.

Time for creativity in the speech development process is very important because it involves trying new things and new ways. It allows people to develop confidence, to explore and play with original ideas, and make connections. By the way, creative speaker’s speech does not sound boring, tiring or monotonous.

Why is oral preparation preferable to practice “in your head”? It is important to practice a lot before giving a speech. Practice “in your head” helps clearly organize your ideas, make conversation better and more natural, and improve your confidence in your material. Sometimes it is not enough to practice your speech silently in your head. It is essential to practice out loud in a situation similar to one a person will face when performing his or her speech.

How will you overcome your personal planning pitfalls? It is important to give yourself time for incubation, build in some time for unexpected emergencies, and start early to practice orally (Sprague, Stuart & Bodary, 2015). In other words, it is necessary to live with your topic for a while before you start composing your speech, and practice your speech aloud several times to be successful.

When it concerns the process of selecting a topic appropriate to the audience, you should explore the audience’s attitudes toward a topic, the size of your audience, and the speaking occasion. You have to consider your interests, personal experiences, and knowledge as well as the audience and purpose. You should also consider the needs of your audience, their level of education, and their expectations.

How might one’s audience influence topic selection? Having a clear idea of the audience will help to determine a topic, its presentation and adaptation to a specific group of people. You should consider demographic factors (age, gender, religion, race, cultural or ethical background), and the level of education (young professionals, middle school students, teenagers, middle-aged adults).

A list of possible speech topics may include topics about illegal immigration, social media influence, international tourism, traffic safety, American politics, drugs and alcohol, environmental protection, etc. I am most interested in speaking about the importance of environmental protection.

General purpose: to persuade.Specific purpose: to convince the audience to change their attitude and behavior about the environment.Primary audience outcome: I want my audience members to start to appreciate our environment, so that future generations may have the opportunity to enjoy the beauty of nature.Contributing audience outcome: I want my audience to

– appreciate and help the environment

– protect cultural heritage

– care about nature.

References:

Sprague, J., Stuart, D. Bodary, D. (2015). The Speaker’s Handbook. Eleventh Edition.    Boston, USA: Cengage Learning. 

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[Accessed: April 1, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: April 1, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: April 1, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: April 1, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: April 1, 2020]