“Demarginalizing the Intersection & Race of Sex” Article Review

In the article “Demarginalizing the Intersection and Race of Sex” by Kimberle Crenshaw, it is shown how the intersectionality of Black women affects them, as well as diminishes their designation in society as a whole in relation to race and sex. In the versions of Sojourner Truth’s speech “Aint I A Woman?” by Frances Gage, Truth shows how society discriminates against women and Black people, however, she also reveals how it is viewed as two separate categories, which diminishes a Black women’s stance in either one. In the version by Marius Robinson,

Truth is shown to Through the use of sarcastic tone and rhetorical questions. She further distinguishes how Black women are not applied to either category, thus proving Crenshaws ideas of intersectionality amongst Black women as prominent in society.

The differences between Robinson and Gage coverage of Crenshaws’ speech are particularly obvious in the style of their articles. Robinson tends to make the article more personal and close to the original version of the speech as the author represents the speech from the first person. Robinson lets Crwnshaws speak for herself in the article. He quotes Crenshaws reputedly and emphasizes her key ideas on the inequality of man and women and the inferiority and intersectionality of Black women that influences their lifestyle and self-perception. The author is sarcastic and very emotional in the presentation of Crenshaws; speech. In contrast, Gage uses the third person narrative, but Gage’s style is less emotional and the author conducts the detailed analysis of the speech with the accurate presentation of the key ideas of Crenshaws’, including the idea of intersectionality of Black women as the milestone idea of the speech.

At the same time, Gage and Robinson convey the idea that there are also gender-related biases which lead to the Black women intersectionality. Gage and Robinson tend to convey the idea that Black women are marginalized by the mainstream culture because they are outsiders because they are Black, but they are also marginalized by the African American community because they are women. Hence, they cannot stand on the equal ground with whites and African American men. Instead, they are outsiders. Both Gage and Robinson convey accurately the idea of the marginalization of Black women and uncover the social construct of that marginal position of Black women as Crenshaws conveys in her speech. In this regard, the similarity between Gage and Robinson derive from the nature of Crenshaws speech. The development of these ideas reveals that Gage and Robinson caught the main point of Crenshaws’ speech.

Nevertheless, Gage and Robinson tend to empathize different aspects of the speech which either author considers being the most important. The ideas conveyed by Robinson are very important but the author tends to omit some elements which are very important for Crenshaws’ speech. Robinsons lack of some important aspects which are actually crucial for the full and adequate understanding of Crenshaws’ speech. In this regard, the aspect of slavery is particularly important because slavery uncovers the ground of the racial inequality and helps to understand better reasons for the marginalization of Black women not only within the society dominated by the white majority but also within the African American community. To put it more precisely, African American men in the time of slavery also mistreated women because of the persisting gender inequality and this trend survived slavery and persisted throughout decades. At the same time, Robinson tends to show Crenshaws critique of a lack of the appeal to reason and facts but the focus on emotions of the audience mainly. This is why Robinson conveys the speech from the first person. He just makes a brief introduction to the speech and conveys the speech from the first person with the focus on the emotional aspect of the speech and arguments drawn by Crenshaws. The focus on the emotional side of the speech implies that there are a few logical arguments and poor appeal to the reason. Truth turns out to engage emotions of the audience and this is her main target in the speech, according to Robinson.

In this regard, both version of the speech are quite effective. They focus on the key ideas of the speech. Robinson pays more attention to the direct presentation of the speech from the first person, whereas Gage tends to conduct the analysis of the key points of the speech. In this regard, Gage is more analytical in the presentation of the speech that makes it more effective in terms of understanding the key points of Crenshaws speech. In such a way, the author makes clear the key ideas of Crenshaws. The delivery of the speech is emotional in Robinson’s coverage and this way of presentation is more attractive for those, who are interested in the direct perception of the speech because the author conveys the speech much closer to the original speech compared to Gage. Robinson’s article is less analytical and it is focused on the raw nerve of the speech instead.

At the same time, Robinson does not necessarily talk about women and Black women hand in hand that is very important for the understanding of the key ideas of the speech. Gage is more objective and detailed in this regard in the depiction of the speech. In such a way, Gage makes the speech more effective in terms of accuracy since he reveals that Crenshaws emphasized the idea of the gender inequality in society that was particularly strong in the African American community.

The first line of speech shows that he just addresses Truth as an emancipated slave and not a woman that divides the two. This idea is pivotal but Robinson tends to omit this important idea. Instead, Robinson opens the speech with the emphasis on the gender difference and womanhood of Truth. In Robinson’s version of the speech, she states how she stands for “women’s rights” and not black women’s rights. In such a way, she does not focus on the racial background as the reason for the divide and intersectionality of Black women.

Robinson presents the speech of Crenshaws, where she speaks mainly about the sexes mainly with disregard to their racial background. In such a way, Robinson achieves the effect of presenting Crenshaws as feminist rather than African American feminist. Gender inequality turns out to be prior to her, while racial inequality is either omitted or insignificant in Robinson’s version of the speech. Robinson focuses on womanhood as the reason for the inequality and raises the problem of the suppression of women’s rights: “Why children if you have women rights give it to her and you’ll feel better” (Robinson). In such a way, the author talks about women rights and even if they were given, it would still alienate Black women because of the discrimination against Black people.

Robinson also Relates to Crenshaws critique off intersectionality by limiting the moral of the speech to women and not encompassing the specific Black women aspect. This is another evidence of the priority of gender inequality over racial inequality in the speech delivered by Crenshaws in Robinson’s version of the speech. This aspect is very important because it creates the overall impression of the speech as the speech encompassing the problem of gender inequality and oppression of women with little attention to the problem of Black women, while their intersectionality is rather the result of the traditional gender inequality that affects both white and black communities.

In this regard Gage’s speech is more specific and refers to intersectionality as the milestone idea of Crenshaws’ speech. Gage builds up the analysis of the speech and focuses on the idea that Black women face the double problem which involves not only gender inequality but also racial inequality since Black women turn out to be outsiders in the white and African American community. The difference in Gage’s version is very important for the development of effective understanding of the original message of Crenshaws.

The language used by Robinson and Gage is also different. Gage argues that the way the words are written are used to describe a black woman, i.e. slave talk. Robinson is more personal in the coverage of the speech since he presents the speech from the standpoint of Crenshaws and uses Biblical references Crenshaws used to enhance the emotional impact on the audience. In such a way, both authors use the language to convey their vision of the speech and the key points they would like to emphasize in the speech and which they consider being the most important in the speech.

Thus, Robinson and Gage depict Crenshaws speech but they do it in quite a different way that leads to the different perception of the speech. Robinson is more emotional and focuses on the gender inequality. In contrast, Gage focuses on intersectionality and racial inequality that emerge from slavery.

Works Cited:

Original Anti-Slavery Bugle, 1851: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83035487/1851-06-21/ed-1/seq-4/

Dialect-removed version of Gage’s account (1989): https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/mod/sojtruth-woman.asp

Phillips-Anderson, M. “Sojourner truth, ‘Address at the woman’s rights Convention in Akron, Ohio,’ (29 may 1851).” Voices of Democracy, vol. 7, 2012, pp. 21- 46.

Sharing is caring!

The terms offer and acceptance. (2016, May 17). Retrieved from

[Accessed: January 23, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016.

[Accessed: January 23, 2020]

freeessays.club (2016) The terms offer and acceptance [Online].
Available at:

[Accessed: January 23, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: January 23, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: January 23, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: January 23, 2020]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: January 23, 2020]