The Relationship between “Parents’ Aspiration & their Children’s Academic Achievement” Research Paper

Article Reference

Murayama, K., Pekrun, R., Suzuki, M., Marsh, H. W., & Lichtenfeld, S. (2016). Don’t aim too high for your kids: Parental over aspiration undermines students’ learning in mathematics. Journal of personality and social psychology, 111(5), 766. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspp0000079

Purpose of Study

The purpose of this study is to help understand clearly the relationship between “parents’ aspiration and their children’s academic achievement” (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016.p.768). It is also aimed at determining the reciprocal effect of the children’s achievement on their parent’s aspirations (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016). Furthermore, this study was carried out in order to highlight the possible negative effect of “parental aspiration with regards to the children’s achievement” (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016.p. 768).

Hypothesis

One of the hypotheses of this study is that parental aspiration is one of the mediators linking family background to children’s educational achievements (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016). Another hypothesis as suggested by Osyerman (2013) is that through socialization processes, parental aspiration can influence children’s academic performance (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016).

Participants

The sample was German students that participated in the Project for the Analysis of Learning and Achievement in Mathematics (PALMA) they included students from grades 5-10 selected “from all three major school types within the German public school system” (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016.p.768), the low-track schools, the intermediate track schools and the higher track schools. The children were assessed each year until grade 10. So for each year the participants include 2070 children, 49.6 percent female from 42 schools with a mean age of 11.7 for grade 5; 2059 students, 50 percent female, mean age of 12.7 for grade 6; 2397 students, 50.1 percent females, mean age 13.7 for grade 7; 2,410 students 50.5% female, mean age  14.8 years for grade 8; 2,528 students 51.1% female, mean age 15.6 years for grade 9; and 1,946 students 51.5% female, mean age  16.5 years for grade 10. Thus averaging a total of 3530, 49.7 percent of females across the grades (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016).

Materials and/apparatus used

To determine the mathematics achievement, a PALMA mathematics achievement test was conducted containing multiple choice as well as open-ended items. The test was constructed using a multimatrix sampling and a balanced incomplete block design (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016). The achievement scores were obtained using one-parameter logistic item response theory called the Rasch scaling using a median of 100 and standard deviation of 15 (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016). Using the German scoring system parents were assessed by a distributing a questionnaire where they report the degree to which they want their children to perform well in mathematics at school (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016).

Procedure Utilized

The PALMA testing procedure was carried out in the classroom towards the end of the school year,  the parent’s questionnaire was also administered at the same time in the school environment.

Summary of results

The results showed that parental aspiration reduced over time as the children progressed from grade to grade and as such the mathematics score of the children also increased as they move up the grades. The aspiration of parents had positive reciprocal effects on the performance of their children. The previous math achievement of the children’s also influences their performance growth as well as the extent to which their parents want them to perform (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016). It also showed that parents over aspiration would have a negative impact on the performance of their children. It showed that over time, parent’s excessive aspiration would harm the child’s mathematics achievement.

Authors Conclusion

The authors concluded that in as much as parental aspiration can be useful for the student’s mathematical achievements, parental over aspiration is detrimental to the children. Furthermore, they concluded that children in higher track schools are more likely to feel the negative impact of parental aspiration and over aspiration (Murayama, Pekrun, Suzuki, Marsh, & Lichtenfeld, 2016).

References

Murayama, K., Pekrun, R., Suzuki, M., Marsh, H. W., & Lichtenfeld, S. (2016). Don’t aim too high for your kids: Parental over aspiration undermines students’ learning in mathematics. Journal of personality and social psychology, 111(5), 766. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspp0000079

Oyserman, D. (2013). Not just any path: Implications of identity-based motivation for disparities in school outcomes. Economics of Education Review, 33, 179 –190. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2012.09.002

The terms offer and acceptance. (2016, May 17). Retrieved from

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"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016.

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freeessays.club (2016) The terms offer and acceptance [Online].
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"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

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"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: January 20, 2022]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: January 20, 2022]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

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