Samuel Johnson (1709–1784) Discusses the Subject of Envy Free Essay

The Topic of Envy in Articles by Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson is concerned with social vices and uses wide ranger in rhetorical strategies to present the negative effect of envy in his Rambler article. Johnson turns to several rhetorical methods. He uses persuasion, creating logical consequences and aiming to prove people the negative impact of envy on their relations and on their inner qualities.  The piece of writing, which judges envy presents moral reflections on human nature, human feelings and emotions. Moral judgements and moral justifications become effective rhetorical means, which make the readers reflect on important philosophical and moral issues. The author also turns to rich metaphors, when speaking about envy. Such bright metaphors, as “poisoning the banquet which they cannot taste, and blasting the harvest which they have no right to reap”, creates bright images and helps   people understand the negative consequences of envy (Johnson, 1).

Johnson turns to comparison, to show how different feelings and emotions can influence people’s lives. He compares envy to interest and vividly illustrates how interest can become a source of positive change and positive development, while envy brings only devastation.

Johnson turns to multiple examples, in order to prove the negative effect of envy. Philosophical reflections are supported by examples from real life and this method makes the narration more simple, vivid and understandable.  Johnson also turns to comparison, called envy the worse of all vices. He believes that it is envy, which creates negative foundation for all other vices.  Bright images, universal symbols and operation general notions become important rhetorical instruments as well.

The author uses step by step analysis of negative characteristics of envy. He presents how it affects both – separate individuals and social groups. His analysis is mostly based on logos and pathos. Logical arguments are designed to convince readers about the negative effects of envy. Rich metaphors, symbols and images create strong emotional appeal.

Works Cited

Rambler, Samuel Johnson (1709–1784), No. 183. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1751

The terms offer and acceptance. (2016, May 17). Retrieved from

[Accessed: September 17, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016.

[Accessed: September 17, 2021]

freeessays.club (2016) The terms offer and acceptance [Online].
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[Accessed: September 17, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: September 17, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: September 17, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: September 17, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: September 17, 2021]
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