The Analysis Of The Impact of Race & Gender On Women’s Work

How do race and class complicate our understanding of the expectations, treatment, and stereotypes that women encounter in the workplace? This issue requires thorough investigation. In a gendered society, race and class have a strong impact on the establishment of gender roles. It is not a secret that women’s experiences of work vary because of differences in the perceptions of gender, race and class. In Evelyn Nakano Glenn’s essay “From Servitude to Service Work” and Nancy MacLean’s essay “Hidden History of Affirmative Action: Working Women’s Struggles in the 1970s and the Gender of Class,” special attention is paid to the analysis of the impact of race, class and gender on women’s work. The intersection of race, gender and class address the impact of stereotypes on women’s career and professional development. According to researchers, “racial ideology is not necessary to explain or justify exploitation, not for lack of racism, but because the justification for inequality does not have to be elaborated in specifically racial terms: instead it can be cast in terms of differences in training, skill, or education” (Glenn 31). Thesis statement: Race, gender and class continue to shape women’s opportunities and treatment in their working lives because of the unchanged gender stereotypes and continuous gender discrimination in the workplace.

To start with, race, gender and class influence the expectations, treatment, and stereotypes encountered by women in the workplace. Stereotypes and the convergence of race, gender and class affect the perceptions about women’s role is the American society. According to Nancy MacLean, anti-discrimination and affirmative action struggles were aimed at challenging the system of expectations and “the patterns of gender inequality” (46). Affirmative action places emphasis on equal treatment, ensuring the establishment of new practices such as “wider advertising of job openings, recruitment from new sources, the analysis of jobs to determine skill requirements, the setting up of training programs to teach those skills, and in some cases the setting of specific numerical goals and timetables for recruiting and promoting women” (MacLean 46).

In addition, it is necessary to consider the role of political agenda established in the American society that addresses the universal needs of women in the workplace. It becomes clear that women’s priorities are different “because gains for some groups may require a corresponding loss of advantage and privilege for other” (Glenn 37). Besides, there are many examples in the history of the racial division of reproductive labor that help to better understand the nature of conflict regarding womanhood and over work, as well as the conditions of family life that form the basis of legacy about women’s role.

Moreover, the perception of race, gender and class affect the expectations about gender pay gap encountered by women in the workplace. The continuing earnings disparity between men and women stands for occupational segregation that leads to the engagement of women in low-paying jobs. As a rule, low-paying jobs are dominated by women.  According to feminist policymakers, there is a need for embracing the concept of comparable worth as an effective strategy to addressing the problem of gender pay gap. It is necessary to “equalize pay for “male” and “female” jobs requiring similar levels of skill and responsibility, even if differing in content” (Glenn 37). As race and gender can be viewed as interconnecting systems, racial division of labor is reinforced by the gender division of labor that affects gender hierarchy in the American society (Glenn 37).

Furthermore, the racial division of labor provides protection to white men’s privilege in the workplace. According to researchers, “white men after all still dominate in professional and higher management positions where they benefit from the paid and unpaid services of women” (Glenn 34). Besides, there is a conflict between men and women in other areas of human activity, including health care and education. For example, “the racial division of nursing labor allows some of the tension to be redirected so that friction arises between registered nurses and aides over work assignments and supervision” (Glenn 34). There is much evidence that white men that form the group of higher-paying employees are isolated from dirty work. As a rule, white women act as the mediators involved in negotiation practices between white male superiors and their color female subordinates. Hence, race and gender dynamics influence interpersonal relations in the workplace, leading to conflicts and tensions between men and women.

Conclusion

Thus, it is necessary to conclude that women still face unequal treatment in employment because of negative stereotypes about women. As a result, race, gender and class play an important role in shaping women’s professional and career opportunities, as well as treatment in the workplace.  Besides, the role of political agenda addresses the universal needs of women in the workplace, highlighting the needs for making changes in the policies to eliminate the negative effects of gender gap. In addition, the continuing earnings disparity between working men and women influences women’s opportunities and treatment in the workplace. The spread of occupational segregation leads to women’s engagement in lower-paying jobs and occupations. Finally, the racial division of labor that is aimed at protecting white men’s privilege in the workplace leads to domination of men in professional and higher management positions. It is very important to understand that the racial division of labor reinforces the gender division of labor, providing men with more privileged positions in the workplace.

Works Cited

Glenn, Evelyn Nakano. “From Servitude to Service Work: Historical Continuities in the Racial Division of Paid Reproductive Labor,” Signs, Vol. 18, No. 1 (Autumn, 1992), pp. 1-43.

MacLean, Nancy. “he Hidden History of Affirmative Action: Working Women’s Struggles in the 1970s and the Gender of Class,” Feminist Studies, Vol. 25, No. 1 (Spring, 1999), pp. 42-78.

The terms offer and acceptance. (2016, May 17). Retrieved from

[Accessed: October 27, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016.

[Accessed: October 27, 2021]

freeessays.club (2016) The terms offer and acceptance [Online].
Available at:

[Accessed: October 27, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: October 27, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: October 27, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: October 27, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: October 27, 2021]
close
Haven't found the right essay?
Get an expert to write you the one you need!
print

Professional writers and researchers

quotes

Sources and citation are provided

clock

3 hour delivery

person