The Role of Religion and the American Education Free Essay

The Role of Religion in United States Schools

 

Religion and the church occupy a priority place in the life of Americans. Therefore, we can confidently say that the overwhelming majority of people in the United States treat the issue of religion with great respect (Frazer 6). Here, it is common for the whole family to attend church and invite a clergyman for a funeral, marriage, or communion. However, worship in America for many is a banal opportunity to go to temples, as to a club of interests, and for others to truly believe in God (Frazer 4).

In the United States, the church is separated from the state (The Educated Citizen 34). According to the historical amendment to the constitution, since 1791, no religion can be elevated to the rank of state. This is because immigrants from around the world gradually settled the country, and each diaspora sought to preserve national customs (School: the story of American public education, video 3). Therefore, it is impossible to give a definite answer to the question about a particular religion in the United States.

The Protestant Church took no less part in the life of the United States, given the fact that it is the largest religious denomination in the country. Protestantism is a separate branch of Christianity with prevailing trends in the modern approach to sacred texts (School: the story of American public education, video 3). Proponents of common religion try to rethink dogmas and adapt them to reality. Back in the 19th century, Bishops played an integral role in the creation and improvement of schools (School: the story of American public education, video 3). However, “as Father Richard Shaw, a church historian, says, “Irish Catholic children were being expected to attend schools where the King James Bible was read, where Protestant hymns were being sung, where prayers were being recited, but most importantly where the textbooks and the entire slant of the teaching was very much anti-Irish and very much anti-Catholic” (The Educated Citizen 31). Even though the majority of that time textbooks could be seen as racial and stereotypical; they still aimed to make the Americans educated.

After the multiple riots and deaths of the rebels, in New York, they decided to eliminate church from education making it possible for all people disregard of religious beliefs gets an education (School: the story of American public education video 4). Since 1850, the American taxpayers pay for the education without sponsoring religious schools. Education in schools does not have a religious background. However, it makes people learn more and widen their worldview regarding a variety of social and other educational aspects. Thus, regardless of the question of what kind of faith among Americans, any denomination is trying to preserve historical traditions and cultures, despite the increasing flow of immigrants from different countries (Frazer 5). There were certain differences, splits in convictions, for example, in the Lutheran and Protestant churches during the American civil war, when the northern Lutheran church advocated the gradual abolition of slavery. In general, there were no major religious conflicts in the United States.

Interestingly, even though, the American society agreed to amend religious aspects in schools. They kept ignoring racial factors. They did not agree to provide the Black people with equal possibilities in all social spheres of living. Even if a black person were more educated and had more knowledge and skills, he or she would not accept to be a good candidate for a good job to get. Thus, the minorities were still accepted as the material to complete the tasks a white person would not do. Black children did not view education as an entrance from the disparate their ancestors historically were in.

All in all, the role of religion and its elimination from the state played a significant role in the development of education and providence of equal right to all the people living in the United States. People of the 19th century made a prominent contribution to the development of their society and democracy values. It helped the diverse community gradually become a generic nation.

Works Cited:

Fraser, James. Religion: Education Book Excerpt. Pp. 1-6

“The Educated Citizen, Part 2” (Reading #3, pages numbered 31 through 39).

The School in the United States: A Documentary History, 3rd edition,  edited by James W. Fraser.

“Virginia Council [London], Instructions to Sir Thomas Gates, Knight, Governor of Virginia, 1636,” top half of page 4.

“Virginia Statutes on the Education of Indian Children Held Hostage…1656,” bottom of page 4 to top of 5.

“Massachusetts’ Old Deluder Satan Law, 1647,” page 8.

Massachusetts’ Old Deluder Satan Law, 1647 Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrSroVgfJMs

School: The Story of American Public Education. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5EoQ45nHKU&t=0s&index=4&list=PL00795BC38B4368D4

School: The Story of American Public Education. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bro_jwgCBs4&index=4&list=PL00795BC38B4368D4

The terms offer and acceptance. (2016, May 17). Retrieved from

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"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016.

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[Accessed: March 4, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: March 4, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: March 4, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: March 4, 2021]

"The terms offer and acceptance." freeessays.club, 17 May 2016

[Accessed: March 4, 2021]